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Bed Wetting
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 Frequently Asked Questions

Q: My son has the habit of wetting his panties during the day time and night bed wetting is also very frequent. We consulted a doctor who suggested us to give him pepsomil tablet. I would like to know if this medicine is safe without any side effects. Please advise.

Jane (Forth Worth, USA)

A: More than medicines your baby requires counseling and bladder training exercises. Get in touch with a child psychologist and get treated.

Dr. Subba Rao


Q: My nephew is six year old. He continues to bed wet at night though he is completely toilet trained during the day. Is this normal? How can we help him get bladder control during the night?

Aditi (Mumbai, India)

A: Please follow the instructions below: 1. No water after 6 PM 2. Make him void urine before going to bed 3. Keep alarm 2 hours after sleep time and wake him up and make him pass urine. 4. Do not make him guilty of his bed wetting by scolding or commenting in front of others. 5. Make him change the wet sheets. 6. Make him keep a dairy in which he will write the date and picture of a sun for dry days and umbrella for wet nights. At the end of 1 month give him a reward for the dry days. 7. In day time encourage him to delay passing urine for as long as possible. This will increase the bladder tone. 8. When he does pass urine after holding ask him to interrupt the stream on command for about 4 to 5 times during the passage. If all these fail consult a child psychiatrist. But remember it will take about 6 months for this method to be effective

Dr. Subba Rao


Q: My 12 year old son still wets his bed. He had gained bladder control when he was 2, but lost it at around 3 years of age. I have tried everything - even stopped giving her water in the evenings, but to no effect. She is fast approaching puberty and needs to gain night-time control. Please suggest a remedy.

Tanisha (Elgin, USA)

A: I think you need to take the help of a child psychiatrist to solve the problem. It has to be solved on top priority. You could also make sure she visits the bathroom at night before going to bed.


Q: My neice is 14 years old and still wets her bed. She has lost all interest in her studies. Please help.

Anju (Dubai, UAE)

A: Ask your niece to stop drinking water from around 7 p.m. Tell her to make sure she visits the bathroom every night, before going to bed, so her bladder is empty. Make sure you read these articles on our site: http://www.indiaparenting.com/develop/data/develop07_04.shtml http://www.indiaparenting.com/raisingchild/data/raisingchild002.shtml Also, make sure your daughter reads this: http://www.indiaparenting.com/raisingchild/data/raisingchild002book.shtml It will help her see that she is not alone there are many others suffering from the same problem. It is not life-long, and millions of people wet their bed even at the age of 14. You could also take your child to a child psychiatrist in case you feel the reasons for bedwetting could be emotional or psychological.

Dr. Balasubramanian


Q: My son is almost 6 years old now. He has not stopped bed wetting. Please suggest a way to stop it. He drinks a lot of water and I do not stop him from doing so.

Jayanti (Ahmedabad, India)

A: 10% of children still bed wet at the age of 4-6. Positive reinforcement like pasting a star on a chart on the days he does not wet his bed, would be an ideal way to start. If he gets 3 or more stars in a week, then you can give him a treat. This should encourage him. Do not at any stage criticize him, especially in front of others. Medicines are not necessary at this stage. They might work initially but bedwetting will resume once the medicines are stopped. If he becomes older and still has this problem, sometime bed pads fitted with alarms might help him. But, I would not suggest this before 7 years of age. Make sure he does not drink fizzy drinks like coke, and don't give him water after 7pm. Make sure he goes to the toilet before turning in for the night, and before you go to bed, wake him up once, and walk him (don't carry him) to toilet once again.

Dr. Balasubramanian


Q: My daughter is 5 years old still wets her bed at least 3-4 times while sleeping at night. What is the remedy for this?

Lata (Mysore, India)

A: Normally we wait until the child is 5 years before we consider any kind of intervention. In the meantime, don't do anything to make your child feel guilty. This will worsen the problem. Just ignore it for now. Things may improve on their own. Don't let her have water in the evenings, and she should avoid tea, coffee and soft drinks.

Dr. Subba Rao


Q: My daughter is habitual bedwetter. Even after relieving her at 10 o'clock at night, we find her bed wet at midnight. We try to avoid giving her water after 8 at night, but she starts crying so we just succumb to her demand. Otherwise she is perfectly playful and active.

Samiya (California, USA)

A: We worry about bed wetting only beyond 5 years of age. Do not try to be very aggressive with regard to toilet training. Give it time. Wake your child up at around 11:30, and walk her to the bathroom so she can relieve herself. Whatever you do, don't shout at her.

Dr. Subba Rao


Q: My daughter is very sensitive and cannot sleep alone with her sister at night. She gets scared, and wets the bed often. Her bedwetting has reduced, and we have been giving him homeopathic medicines. However, many precautions need to be taken so she doesn't wet the bed. She is very stubborn. She is also a little overweight What should we do?

Alka (Goa, India)

A: You have said your daughter is sensitive. So, making rules with her might not help. Talk to her and try to help her cope with this fear. She is overweight. Perhaps she is bullied in school for her appearance? This would explain behavioral problems like fear of sleeping alone, bed wetting etc. Avoiding giving her drinks like colas, coffee and tea. Reward her for nights she listens to you.

Dr. Balasubramanian


Q: My son wets his bed even at the age of 15. What should we do? Please suggest a remedy.

Prem (Mumbai, India)

A: 1. Has the child ever been dry since birth or has he been bedwetting all through. 2. Is there any family conflict or tension? 3. Does he wet the bed even when he sleeps during the day? 4. Does he wet the pants otherwise? 5. Has he had any urinary infection in the past? 6. Please get a urine examination and an x-ray of the lumbo-sacral spine. After you clarify these doubts, I can help you find a solution.

Dr. Subba Rao


Q: My nephew is 11 years old. He is very overweight, and he still wets the bed. It is this bedwetting problem that we are very worried about. We have tried giving him allopathic and homeopathic medicines, but they just worked for a short while. He is also scared of the dark and he doesn't like to sleep alone. What should his ideal weight be?

Ajit (Konkan, India)

A: You have mentioned 2 problems: obesity and bedwetting. The two may be related to each other. Obesity is measured in terms of Body Mass Index (BMI). The ideal BMI for a 10 year old boy should be less than 20. The common causes for obesity are overeating and genetics. If he has hormonal problems he is more likely to be obese. You should see a doctor to have a few blood tests to rule out these problems and also to check his cholesterol levels. If he does not have any problems then you should put him on a healthy diet. If his cholesterol levels are high then he is more likely have high blood pressure and other cardiovascular complications very early in life. Bed wetting can occur either because of these hormonal problems or because of obesity. The disfigurement might lead to bullying and this might cause emotional stress on the affected person. This could be the reason for behavioural problems like fear of the dark and bedwetting. Try and work on his obesity first.

Dr. Balasubramanian


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