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You are here: Home > Doctors on call > FAQ's > Planning a Baby > Blockage of Fallopian Tubes

Blockage of Fallopian Tubes

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Frequently Asked Questions

Q: About 7 years ago I underwent surgery to reverse a tubal ligation. It was successful and I was given the green light to try to become pregnant. After almost 1.5 years of fertility drugs, tests, and surgeries, I was told that my body was rejecting my husband's sperm. That it was attacking and killing it. I was told that there was nothing that could be done. I was wondering if there have been any new treatments for this. I am 35+ and my husband is younger with no children of his own. Is there any hope for us? Thank you for your time!
Julie (USA)

A: There are three tests that you should undergo to get to the root of your problem: 1. There is a blood test called Sperm Antibody Titre that both you and your husband should undergo. 2. Your husband should also undergo a sperm test for Agglutination. 3. Although you have undergone surgery, which at that time may have been considered positive, you should once again take a Tubal Patency Test to ensure that there is no blockage. If the Sperm Antibody Test and the Agglutination test are positive then there is a treatment wherein administration of steroid takes care of the rejection of your husband’s sperm. I would also like to bring to your attention that women over the age of 35 run a greater risk of giving birth to a genetically abnormal child, therefore it is important that when you get pregnant you undergo a CVS test between 9-11 weeks of pregnancy to rule out Triosomy 21 or Down’s Syndrome.

Q: About 7 years ago I underwent surgery to reverse a tubal ligation. It was successful and I was given the green light to try to become pregnant. After almost 1.5 years of fertility drugs, tests, and surgeries, I was told that my body was rejecting my husband's sperm. That it was attacking and killing it. I was told that there was nothing that could be done. I was wondering if there have been any new treatments for this. I am 35+ and my husband is younger with no children of his own. Is there any hope for us? Thank you for your time!
Julie (USA)

A: When you say the surgery for reversal of tubal ligation was successful, you mean that the surgeon informed you that the tubes were open at the end of the surgery. However, this does not mean that the tubes will always work after the surgery! Given your age and the fact that you have not responded to the treatment you have taken so far, the best treatment option for your would be IVF (in-vitro fertilization). Time is at a premium for you, so you need to push forward aggressively!

Q: What can be the cause for bilateral cornual tubal blockage? I also have endometriosis and an ovarian cyst (right side). What are my options if I want to get pregnant?
Ami (Indore, India)

A: It is sometimes difficult to determine the reason for a tubal blockage. It could be because of an infection, a tubal spasm or a mucus plug. Your first step should be to try to open the tubes. This is best done for corneal blocks by FTR (fluoroscopic tubal recanalisation), a procedure done by expert radiologists in the X-ray suite. There is a 50% chance they will be able to open the tubes. If they cannot, then your best treatment option would be IVF (in vitro fertilisation, test tube baby).

Q: What is the line of treatment for a patient with distal end tubal block (fimbrial end)? History of first F.T.N.D. and h/o one D/C done five years ago. No other gynaecological problems. (Patient's age – 37 yrs, weight – 70 kg.)
Riten (Ulhasnagar, India)

A: 1. Tubal surgery 2. IVF. Tubal surgery can be either microsurgery or laparoscopic surgery. However, pregnancy rates with these are usually poor. The reason is that while surgery can open the tubes, these tubes are often damaged (which is why they got blocked in the first place!) Surgery cannot repair this damage, so the tubes still do not work, even after the surgery. This is why IVF (in-vitro fertilisation, test tube baby) is a better treatment option.

Q: We got married a few years ago, but my wife is unable to conceive (felopian tube dilated due to TB). What should we do? Can you give me the address of a fertility clinic in Bombay where we can go for a consultation?
Ajay (UP, India)

A: Your problem seems to be tubal factor infertility and your best treatment option would be IVF. Our clinic address is: Malpani Infertility Clinic Jamuna Sagar SBS Road Colaba Bombay 400 005 Tel: 215 1065, 215 1066

Q: My friend has been married for few years now, but has not conceived. She is 28 and her husband is 32. She has been diagnosed to be having damaged fallopian tubes. So there are few chances of her getting pregnant. Now she has been asked to take injections which are very costly. She is not very well off. The doctor also does not guarantee the effectiveness of the treatment. What should she do? There are so many women in India who need proper attention. There problems may be curable but they need proper guidance and help from specialists like you. Please let me know how can I help her.
Priya (Baroda, India)

A: If her tubes are damaged, then her only treatment option would be IVF (in vitro fertilisation, test tube baby). She should not waste her time, money and energy pursuing incorrect treatment. This will just lead to frustration, and she will get fed up with all doctors, so that even if treatment can help her, because she has lost confidence in doctors, she will not be in a position to take this treatment. Financial limitations are a major problem today for treatment of infertile couples. Hopefully, insurance companies in India will start covering for this treatment - but this will only happen if infertile patients get together and lobby for their rights!

Q: We have been married for many years now. My wife had a kink in her fallopian tubes. She underwent a microsurgery and everything went well. However, we still don’t have any child.
Ritesh (Chennai, India)

A: You say your wife had a kink in the fallopian tubes, which was treated by surgery. However, the results of microsurgery for tubal damage/tubal block are actually quite poor, because surgery cannot repair damaged tubes. Your wife needs to have a second-look laparoscopy done to assess what the effect of the surgery has been. If your wife's tubes are still blocked, then your best treatment option would be IVF - in vitro fertilisation (test tube baby).

Q: I am almost 30 years old. We have been married for four years. I had an MTP done few months after my marriage. Since I did not conceive after that, I was examined and a laproscopy and HSG were done. Results showed that my fallopian tubes had bilateral cornual blocks on both tubes. Last year I went through an IVF treatment, which was a failure. My hubby's semen analysis and SFT results are normal. Last month I went to a fertility specialist who advised me to go for IVF and we made all arrangements for this month. Unfortunately my blood test results show that FSH as 20 on 3rd day, so she postponed my IVF treatment for some time. Meanwhile, she also asked me to try FTC (Follicular Tubal Cleaning). I went through FTC last week and the report and x-ray show that both my corneal tube blocks were removed and have become normal. Moreover, she asked me to do hydrotubation thrice on alternate days after FTC. She has given us 6 months time to conceive naturally. Is the outcome of FTC permanent or temporary? Will I conceive naturally now?
Prerna (Jaipur, India)

A: 1. You have 2 separate problems. The first is the cornual block, which seems to have been dislodged by a FTR - fluroscopic tubal recanalisation, in which the doctor opens the tube. The results of a FTR are variable; and the tube can get blocked again, so you should repeat a HSG (X-ray of the uterus and tubes) to find out if the tubes have closed again. 2. Your second problem is the elevated FSH level on Day 3 which may mean that your ovary may not produce eggs properly. This lowers the chances of conceiving naturally. I would suggest that you repeat the tests again (from 2 independent reliable labs) to confirm their accuracy, before making decisions based on this.

Q: How successful is the lazer therapy to open the blockage of Fallopian tubes?
Asha (Sydney, Australia)

A: The fallopian tube is a very complex structure, and the fact that it has got blocked means it is damaged. While surgery can sometimes ‘open’ a tube, it cannot restore its function, so even after surgery, the tubes does not work properly. Pregnancy rates after surgery for blocked tubes (whether the doctor uses a laser or not) are very poor.

Q: I have heard that the blockage of the Fallopian tubes can be opened by lazer therapy? Is this true?
Mahima (Bangalore, India)

A: The role of laser surgery to open blocked fallopian tube is controversial. There are two schools of thought: one propagates its use in breaking adhesions and another says that it causes to much plum (smoke) which may have harmful effects and add to the tubal damage. However, a lot of work is going on at present in use of lasers and the exact answer to your question will be answered depending on further studies.

Q: Can the blockage of Fallopian tubes be opened by laser therapy?
Ramya (NY, USA)

A: Laser therapy is new and is not very successful. People have now been undergoing Laproscopy surgery, which is not very convincing either. An open surgery has the highest success rate.




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